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Jaspell Jaldi's Typing Methods

Jaspell Jaldi for word processing in Windows offers two typing methods: Romanized and Mapped. Alternatively, the guides, as shown below, can be clicked on with your mouse.

Romanized Typing Method
Typing is essentially a simple Romanized phonetic method which functions commonly and consistently throughout all the multiple languages supported. For example, if you type "kitaab " with any one of the scripts 'on', you will get the proper script equivalent that reads "kitaab" (even if you don't actually speak that language!)
  kitaab
            "kitaab" in Bengali, Hindi, Gujarati, and Punjabi (1780 bytes)  
                     "kitaab" in Naskh with and without diacritics and similarly in Nastaliq (1468 bytes)   
        "kitaab" in Japanese Hira Gana, Kata Kana, and Romaji (1693 bytes)

As the range of sounds exceeds the 26 English /ASCII keyboard keys, we sometimes use a group sequence or combination of keys to produce a sound, as shown on a Romanized key guide that you can display. For example, a dental "t" may be typed "t", but an aspirated/breathed/huffed "t" sounds like and is typed as "th". For reflexive/cerebral forms in Brahmi-based phonetic classification you would just add an "*" (or "x", if you want to avoid using the shift key) as a distinguishing mark. Long vowels are double the single vowels, hence: short "a" and long "aa", "i", "ii", etc.
                      Excerpt from character guide based on Romanized equivalent on a standard keyboard layout (2658 bytes)
In each syllable type the consonant and then the vowel or space or punctuation: you thus signify the completion of the current syllable.
k or ka "ka";
ki "ki";
kii "kii"
By dint of Jaspell's internal programming you only need to use one keyboard location for all forms of any particular letter in one of these alphabets. So, all forms of the consonant "k" (or "ka") are obtained by pressing the key k, no matter what vowel or consonant combination there is, or whether it is initial, medial, terminal, or independent (important in Naskh and Nastaliq).

Mapped Script Typing
This second typing method is also provided for some of the script systems, such as for the Brahmi-based scripts . This assigns the 52 upper and lower case letter keys to provide directly the different individual characters - if 52 is enough for the script alphabet. Starting from top left on the keyboard, the keys unshifted and shifted begin in vernacular alphabetical order:-
For Hindi, Marathi, Nepali, Sanskrit it is ka, kha, ga, gha, and so on.
                       Excerpt from character typing guide based on mapping characters across the keyboard (3264 bytes)
Vowels are in the area under the left hand. To change the inherent vowel and make "ka" into "ki" or "kii", for example, you then, of course, would have to type the key for the relevant vowel. Hence,
[q] "ka"; [q][s] "ki"; [q][S] "kii". By dint of Jaspell's internal programming, which is the same as for the Romanized typing method, you still only need use one keyboard location for all forms of any particular letter in one of these alphabets. So, in this example, all forms of the consonant "k" (or "ka") are obtained by pressing the key labelled q, no matter what vowel or consonant combination there is, or whether it is initial, medial, terminal, or independent.
This method at first seems simpler by skipping the typing of markers or groups of keys for one letter. However, the map layout may not be similar for different scripts, plus you have to reach often for the shift key when typing. A Mapped Script key guide is provided for those who prefer it initially.)

Simple Access to Complex Forms
With either of these typing methods (Romanized or Mapped), you just input the plain characters (in the order in which a dictionary, for example, would use them ) and delight to see how the proper form of each character is placed automatically into your document with respect to context. You therefore avoid having to learn how to obtain lots of special forms of characters that other software products require.

Right-to-Left Control
The typing process for right-to-left scripts currently requires you to type a "carriage-return" at the left hand end of each line, as word-wrap is only provided in left-to-right mode. Although this seems a disadvantage while typing, it does ensure that, if you select lines of such text (Ctrl + c) and paste them into another programme like Word for Windows (Ctrl + v) operating in left-to-right word-wrap mode, you will not lose the proper word and line order!

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Date of last edit: 20 November 2013